Beef Cuts Chart

Courtesy of the Certified Angus Beef brand

Did you know that beef is divided into sections called primal cuts? From these large areas, the meat cutter makes smaller portions suitable for individual or family-sized packaging. Different cuts of beef require unique cooking methods. A chuck, for example, makes an excellent roast but isn't as pleasing when pan-broiled. With these details in mind, we have prepared the following information for you to use as a guide when selecting and preparing Certified Angus Beef cuts.

Carcass Cuts

Chuck
Meat is basically muscle, and the chuck happens to be a heavily exercised area. Luckily, this area contains a great deal of connective tissue, including collagen. Collagen melts during cooking, making the meat intensely flavorful. Cuts from this area benefit from slow, wet cooking methods like stewing, braising or pot-roasting.

Rib
Tender and flavorful ribs can be cooked any number of ways. Most recipes call for ribs to be roasted, sauteed, pan-fried, broiled, or grilled.

Short Loin
This area boasts extremely tender cuts and can be prepared without the aid of moist heat or long cooking times. Cuts from the short loin may be sauteed, pan fried, broiled, pan broiled or grilled.

Sirloin
"The backbone's connected to the … hipbone"—not a song, but a sirloin. These tender cuts respond well to sauteing, pan-frying, broiling, pan-broiling or grilling.

Flank
This meat is lean, muscular and very flavorful. Flank is primarily used for flank steaks and rolled flank steaks. It can also be used for kabobs.

Short Plate
This section is best used for stew meat, where its rich, beefy flavor can be appreciated.

Round
The round consists of lean meat well-suited to long, moist cooking methods.

Shank/Brisket
Traditionally used for corned beef, brisket is best prepared with moist heat. Suitable preparation methods include stewing, braising and pot-roasting.